The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation cautions drivers against engaging in activities that may interfere with careful and attentive driving.

We have experience representing clients injured in accidents caused by distracted drivers.

Drivers may allow non-driving activities to divert their focus

Motorists may engage in activities that cause them to turn their attention away from the road or take their hands off the wheel:

  • Looking for something or shuffling personal belongings around inside the car.
  • Styling their hair or putting on make-up.
  • Adjusting the radio or other audio device to search for music or programming.
  • Eating, drinking or smoking.
  • Talking to friends, children or other passengers.
  • Redirecting their attention to accidents or construction zones.

Sidetracked drivers may have a slower reaction time when other vehicles or pedestrians cross their path. They may also be more likely to veer out of their lane, lose control of their vehicle or stop suddenly with little warning to the car behind them.

Texting behind the wheel may lead to distracted driving

Cell phones often play a role in diverting drivers’ attention from the road. State law prohibits drivers from using “interactive wireless communication devices” to send, read or write a text while driving. This law extends to smartphones, wireless phones and other devices that people may use for texting, emailing, instant messaging or surfing the internet. It does not currently prohibit talking on a phone while driving.

A motorist who drives negligently because of distractions may cause an accident that harms others. Someone injured by a negligent driver may have up to two years after the incident to file a lawsuit.

Our website has additional information about the consequences of distracted driving.